Saturday, 30 November 2019

South Island

I took a photo somewhere on South Island in New Zealand on our 2015 trip, but the colours were washed out and grey.  Interpreting the photo in the colours from Derric Van Rensburg's work seemed a way of bringing the subject to life.  So I looked at a number of images of his paintings, pulled various fabrics from my stash, then didn't look at his work again until I had finished. 

I tried doing fused applique slightly differently from normal, applying the Steam a Seam to the background, then gradually adding the fabrics.  I now know why this is not a good way of working,  as the Steam a Seam didn't reach the edges of all the pieces of fabric I had lots of problems with the edges fraying.  I tried it in an effort to be more improvisational in the placing of the fabrics, rather than having the entire picture meticulously drawn out beforehand. Back to the old way of working  I guess.

10 comments:

  1. Great interpretation using your own image. I quite like the frayed edges as they soften the lines giving a more natural look.

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  2. Good thinking on using a scene from New Zealand and incorporating it the way you have using the colours our artist uses. I tried the same method recently using steam-a-seam the way you did and it didn't work for me either so that was a piece I tossed out and had to start again. Nevertheless you have produced a really lovely piece of work which speaks of our artist, his colours and style and made it your own.

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  3. One of the wonderful advantages of belonging to this group has been the use of innovative techniques . It gives us freedom to try doing our fabric art differently. I really like the slightly frayed look of this piece- gives it a ,as Phil remarked ,'a more natural look .'

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  4. It's nice to be able to make these pictures from our photographs I think. I use a thin batting that has "glue" on it. It anchors the larger pieces, but then I have to put something on the back of the rest of the fabric to stick it to the main pieces. So I know your frustration - tried that myself! Nicely done - I like the touch that your fence provides.

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  5. This is a very interesting way of working, I have been down that road myself (and is inspired to do so again). I think you have made a lovely quilt, based on someone's else's art, and made it entirely your own.

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  6. I like the frayed edges too, and the way you have reinterpreted a photo that you weren't maybe quite satisfied with

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  7. Live with the frayed edges - they sit comfortably in your piece. Steam-a-Seam 2 should allow you to trace the outline, then cut so having glue to the edge of your piece allowing you to remove one piece of paper and playing with the positioning before ironing down. Nice to be able to make a permanent memory of your wonderful holiday. Hilary

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  8. What a lovely scene you have created Linda. It's amazing how the light changes so much between different places isn't it? The grey light of New Zealand, even when there is full glare never ever gets to that vibrant brightness of that in Africa.
    As for the Steam a seam..... I share your pain. I have vowed never to use it ever again!

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    Replies
    1. I actually love Steam-a-seam, it was just the way I tried to use it this time that caught me out. Back to the old tried and trusted methods from now on!

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  9. Stunning piece Linda. I also look at the artists work a few times and then 'do my own thing', and only look at his work again after I have finished my piece. I haven't tried Steam-a-seam; I usually use the double sided applique paper for Fusing.

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