Monday, 31 August 2015

Story Line

After all the fun Phillida and I had creating cloth which we both thought was remotely close to the inspiration source she had chosen, I have finished up almost obliterating the fabric/colour!  I love the colour and have two more pieces which I hope to use in the future.

But of the three ideas that came late into my head this one was shouting the loudest.  Many years ago I took a class at Birmingham with a lovely tutor, Sarah Fincken, about creating a story quilt.  It was called Track Mapping.  I enjoyed the class and have a design worked out for a large quilt.  I guess this has always been in the back of my mind and the colour rekindled the idea.

Well, the quilt was started on Saturday afternoon and finished just before lunch today - talk about taking it to the wire!  There is raw edge machine appliqué, hand and machine stitching and a lot of paint.  Phil, I haven't a clue who the kind lady at Kearsney was who gave me the dot-making tool, but she saw it for sale on the Guild stand and thought of me.  It is magic!



There are painted women dancing around a camp fire with smoke, dreaming tracks, kangaroo tracks, clouds with rain falling on a waterhole and the sun.

What fun.  I am also aware that there is a school of thought that thinks using aboriginal icons by non-natives is bordering on the offensive.  I hope I haven't offended anyone or trodden on any toes.  

Hilary

13 comments:

  1. This piece looks like such fun and everything just dances across the fabric. I really do like your piece Hilary and it is so different. If I may ask in my ignorance 'what is a dot making tool'?? Have I missed out on something that others know about!!

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  2. Wow, Hilary! I have never heard of Track Mapping. Is it used to tell stories or as a navigational aid or both? Love the dots: lucky you to have found such a specialized tool.

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    1. I have a feeling it has more of a story telling history but have been used as a navigational aid in the past. If you google aboriginal art symbols it brings up a wealth of wonderful art.

      Hilary

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  4. Patricia, during the paint play-day at Kearsney College I had bemoaned the fact that I had a lot of circle making things (cotton reels, etc) in my tool box but didn't have anything for making solid circles = dots. A lovely lady found this little packet of 2 plastic cross-shaped (X shaped) tools. Each end of the arms has a different size to make different sized dots. It is such a simple idea but brilliant. They only measure 3" across.

    Hilary

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  5. I really like this!! There is a movement and joyfulness in it to me. Having used Haida Indian images in my own work I hope people don't get offended by the use of native art; to me it is celebrating their art, not encroaching on their culture.

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  6. Love it! I love dots and crave your dot making tool now. I can't imagine what it looks like from your description. This is a great piece!

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  7. I think you've well honoured Australian aboriginal art. Especially because you have a story to go with it. It's a lovely piece.

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  8. It is your own story line and beautifully told.

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  9. Wow so clever and a fantastic piece. Now I know how useful my 'tool' is going to be. Although it can be frustrating it is quite amazing how your fabric value changes once you start playing around with it. 'Go with the flow' as Keith (Hilary's hubbie ) would say.

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  10. I really love this one, Hilary. It's really lively and joyous.

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  11. rich and evocative. great use of technique and color. so well balanced - i love it!

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  12. Seems as my thoughts have been expressed, 'Wow and Fun"! You have nailed the designing of an aboriginal print, Hilary. Great idea!

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