Tuesday, 31 May 2016

Klee

Cellular Love

 

To experiment with our first piece I decided to focus on edge and proportion using the concept of colour as a main subject and to reduce the shapes into softened geometrical forms. Klee was an expert at colour proportion to evoke an emotional response or mood in his work and this can be a fun concept to try just on its own with simple shapes to learn about colour and expression.

I like the edge development best in the smallest block in the left corner which reminds me of the treatment in Klee's Coming to Bloom 1914 where each colour has been filled in with soft edges onto a dark background giving the effect of a a chalk scribble that appears to be floating. I will use this again. I also like his muted oranges against the compliment of blue purple better than the bright orange against the purple.The photo here does makes it worse

The two posters on my wall at art school were Klee's " Fish Magic" with all the coloured shapes emerging from darkness and a bright Kandinsky abstract landscape, so free form in line and colour. I think the idea of colour as subject and symbols as abstraction were two eye opening  concepts for me which I vividly remember blowing my mind.  It will be nice to revisit the different artistic movements during our new series. We should be glad to never have had to live through someone like Hitler placing controls on our lives and creativity and having our work destroyed like these artists did.We surly can be very thankful for that.






Coming to Bloom
Paul Klee 1914

 Coming to bloom - Paul Klee

10 comments:

  1. I find my eye pulled very strongly by the main block near the centre, and I love the colour combinations in it. I like the piece very much, but wonder what it would have looked like if the blocks had been vertical rather than on point.

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  2. I don't mind your brighter take on the colours at all, Michele. The brighter turquoise balances against the brighter orange, etc. Who knows what pigments Klee would have used if he had access to today's new paint formulations?

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  3. Geometry rules, how interesting it is to see Klee at an angle. I agree with Heather about your colour choices - interestingly I caught a glimpse of our banner in the side bar next to your piece and was amazed at the similarity (I had my glasses at the end of my nose so was seeing both in a kind a blur!!!)

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  4. Klee's title, 'Coming to Bloom' would be perfect for your piece! Love those blues.

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  5. Your colour choices are wonderful as you have used most of the colours Klee used but a much brighter version. Although he loved colour, his piece is quite muted and yours glows. As Heather said, one wonders what Klee's work would look like if he had access to what we have in our modern world.

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  6. Although a much brighter piece than Klee's, I love the choice of colours and the proportions you chose. Yes, the small block on the left of your piece is a mini version of Klee's Coming to Bloom - and yes, those soft edge blocks of colour are just like chalk scribbles. H

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  7. I agree with all of the above - I like your selection of colours for sure.

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  8. Putting the geometrical pieces at angles was such a good idea . I wondered how one would interpret one of his purely geometric pieces and you have done it so well -Klee's piece in brighter colours and similar shapes but angled . R

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  9. Ditto to what has been said. Interesting comment about the two colour strengths. Being an artist most of his work surfaces are textured in some way which breaks up the solidness of colour ... how different would it look on a smooth surface?

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  10. Ditto to what has been said. Interesting comment about the two colour strengths. Being an artist most of his work surfaces are textured in some way which breaks up the solidness of colour ... how different would it look on a smooth surface?

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