Friday, 8 November 2013

Capturing the Elusive Periwinkle





It worked! I went back to the dyeing table, and I repeated the same ratio (1 part Boysenberry to 3 parts Turquoise) but this time with very hot water. The turquoise stuck around through the "fixing" process and the result is a really good match.

It's so perplexing, Helena. Your instructor, Ann Johnston, told you to stay away from Turquoise. When I took Elizabeth Barton's course, Dyeing to Design, she specified Turquoise as one of the six primary colours we were to use to create all other colours. It was to be used with the two other cool primaries, Fuchsia and Lemon Yellow.

Time to move on, I guess?





6 comments:

  1. What a wonderful on line workshop we have experienced with you. I am glad your perseverance has paid off and look forward to seeing the final product. I think that we do have to accept that every bodies interpretation of the colour is going to vary because of the different monitors in play. I am using thread so this could be interesting.

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  2. I so admire your persistence - I'm happy dyeing when serendipity is in charge but working towards a specific colour would be beyond me!

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  3. You've nailed it Heather. The second one up looks perfect to me. After having read of your problems I decided to try and buy commercial fabric, and am very pleas with one of my purchases. Can't post photos now as I'm delighted to say we are in France, having flown down for a quick visit before mick's operation.

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  4. You've nailed it Heather. The second one up looks perfect to me. After having read of your problems I decided to try and buy commercial fabric, and am very pleas with one of my purchases. Can't post photos now as I'm delighted to say we are in France, having flown down for a quick visit before mick's operation.

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  5. If your interest in this colour is not entirely exhausted, please visit my blog and look at the last two posts. Michele and I visited a Montreal gallery and saw two painters who both have a masterful way with periwinkle, and I have profiled their work.

    http://heatherdubreuil.blogspot.ca

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  6. Here's a response from Vicki Jensen of PRO Chemical & Dye about using Turquoise:

    "I would tend to agree with Ann Johnston about the turquoise. Because it has a larger dye molecule size than the other pure colors, it is the slowest to react. That means it needs more energy from a slightly higher dye bath temperature or a longer curing time if doing a direct application process, to get the full potential of its color."

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